RECONSTRUCTION OF A CORONARY ARTERY FLOW FROM IVUS MEDICAL IMAGES

 In All Presenters, Hechter, Raz

PRESENTING AUTHORS FULL NAME: Raz Hechter

INSTITUTION: Ben-Gurion University, Beer Sheva, Israel.

ADDITIONAL AUTHORS NAMES, AS TO BE PUBLISHED: Alexander Yakhot

BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Vascular lesions are usually accompanied by changes in arterial stiffness, attenuation, morphology and flow field. There is a gap between comprehensive useful information for physicians and achievable data through clinical imaging and measurement. To resolve this gap, many studies based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have suggested the use of simulations as a tool that completes the picture by adding upon the measured data. Since it is not suitable for patient-specific analysis, it cannot be accepted by the clinical community as a diagnostic tool. The objective of this work is to develop and test a new tool for assimilating clinical imaging to aid in finding and assessing pathologies resulting from lesions.

METHOD: The proposed tool utilizes the Kriging method originally developed for spatial interpolation also in time. In conjunction with the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), the approach has been applied for reconstruction of arterial flow field from patient-specific intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) images. The Kriging interpolation fills-in the gaps in the data, while the proper orthogonal decomposition eliminates noise.

RESULTS: The method was tested on an IVUS clinical clip consisting of 48 frames (~7 sec). The figures show a selected frame from the IVUS clip along with its reconstructed form. The reconstructed velocity field is quite smooth; the coronary artery wall border (in blue) is recognized.

Figure: Left – IVUS image; right – reconstructed axial velocity field with the arterial border in blue.

CONCLUSION: The proposed Kriging space-time interpolation method yields a flow field, which enables further calculation of hemodynamic properties as well as border detection.

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